THE ROAD TO SUBARU SAFETY

Subaru’s underlying concept...


1960s
1960 -
Advanced, realistic crash testing conducted as a Japanese manufacturer making use of guiderails and crash test dummies.
1960 -
Rear-end crash testing of the Subaru360.
1965
The first Japanese manufacturer to begin crash testing (frontal, rear-end).
1966
Subaru1000: Subaru’s first FWD car powered by the SUBARU BOXER is released. High levels of safety are obtained in collision safety testing.

1970s
1971
A special Subaru collision safety programme is developed as part of collision safety testing for the Leone.
1972
Subaru Leone 4WD Station Wagon, the world’s first mass-produced 4WD passenger car, is released. It features a selective system where the driver could switch from 4WD to 2WD mode.
1977
Engine drop tests begin for the American Leone (L-Series).
1979
Leone 4WD tests: As part of steps to improve collision safety for the Leone 4WD, the propeller shaft and differential are designed to split and drop down during a collision.

1980s
1981
“Leone 1800cc 4WD Automatic” is released, using the world’s first wet hydraulic multi-plate clutch in the rear wheel drive transfer case of its AWD automatic transmission.
1983
4WD turbo Leone equipped with an air suspension system to hydraulically adjust the height of the car.
1986
Research into the use of high-tensile materials for car frames begins.
1986
XT: Plastic bumpers that comply with the five-mile-an-hour rule introduced in America as the first “energy absorbing bumpers” developed in the world.
1986
Leone 3-door hatchback coupe RX-II (1.8-litre turbo engine) uses a full-time AWD system with a bevel-geared and differential-lock centre differential.
1987
MP-T 4WD developed into the full-time 4WD “ACT-4” system, operating on pulse control to predict front and rear torque distribution.
1989
First generation Legacy released. The model became the Subaru’s new safety standard in order to further improve safety and protection in actual collisions.
1989
Turbo Legacy comes equipped with the full-time 4WD system with viscous coupling LSD centre differential. A tandem brake booster braking system increases the safety of the car.

1990s
1990
Installation of on-board crash data acquisition systems/crash test facilities.
1991
“VTD-4WD (Variable Torque Distribution 4-Wheel Drive)” for outstanding turning, and the “4WS” (four-wheel steering system) installed in the SVX for a superior balance between safety and driving enjoyment.
1993
Second generation Legacy: The rigidity of frameless car bodies that provide protection against offset collisions is increased for even higher levels of collision safety.
1996
First generation Forester: Built on the Ring-Shaped Reinforcement Frames body for the current superior levels of collision safety.
1998
Third generation Legacy: The Ring-Shaped Reinforcement Frames body and front frame structure envelopes the Horizontally-Opposed Engine. The installation of front side airbags raises collision safety to unprecedented levels.
1999
“ADA (Active Driving Assist)” driver assist system using stereo cameras is released and installed in the Japanese Legacy.

2000s
2003
Car-to-Car crash tests: To improve safety even further, construction of crash test facilities that recreate actual crash conditions is completed.
2007
07MY Impreza awarded the ‘07/08’ Grand Prix by JNCAP. The same year, the Impreza is given the title of the Safest Japanese car.
2007
Safety improved immensely with the “SUBARU Dynamic Chassis Control Concept (DC³)” concept, to take driving enjoyment to new heights.
2008
“EyeSight” is released as the world’s first safety technology operating using only stereo cameras.
2009
Fifth generation Legacy: A frame mount is used for the engine to help improve frontal collisions, rating at the top of safety assessments around the world.

2010s
2010
EyeSight is improved further as a highly-advanced crash avoidance system installed in the Japanese Legacy/Outback.
2014
EyeSight is enhanced, with improvements made to core functions such as the use of colour stereo camera images